We're here to help you stay healthy

We spent years engineering Ribbon so that anyone could perform a hospital grade diagnostic test at home. And we made it as easy as taking a picture.

Ribbon Kit

$29.99
The Ribbon App is Completely Free and Works on All Smartphones
We've developed an easy-to-use health kit that enables anyone to get a hospital-grade health check in just 2 minutes using a test strip and a smartphone. Simply dip the strip in urine, take a photo of the strip on a color card, and receive instant results. Our test screens for major issues such as kidney disease, liver disease, UTIs, diabetes, metabolic conditions, infections, inflammations, dehydration, and more. No hidden fees!

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Size: 10 Tests

Ribbon At Home

How it Works

Ribbon Checkup Enthusiasts #Ribbon Checkup

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Try the Ribbon Checkup Web App

The Ribbon Checkup App is free and available online at test.ribboncheckup.com

Try the Ribbon App

Using Your Kit

A Step-byStep Guide to the Ribbon Kit

Step 1

Dip your test strip in a urine sample. The Cups are included in your kit.

Step 2

Take a picture of your test strip after placing it on the included color card.

Step 3

The Ribbon App will analyze your image and deliver results immediately on your phone.

Step 4

If you have any issues you can connect with a doctor for care and advice.

What are some of the most common things discovered with the Ribbon Checkup kit?

Kidney Disease
  • Protein: Indicates kidney damage or disease.
  • Blood: Sign of kidney stones or other kidney issues.
Liver Disease
  • Bilirubin: Indicates liver disease or bile duct blockage.
  • Urobilinogen: Increased levels indicate liver disease or hemolytic anemia.
Urinary Tract Infections
  • Leukocytes: Presence of white blood cells.
  • Nitrites: Produced by bacteria indicating infection.
Diabetes
  • Glucose: High levels indicate diabetes.
  • Ketones: Indicates the body is breaking down fat for energy.
Hepatitis
  • Bilirubin: Indicates liver inflammation.
Bladder Cancer
  • Blood: Persistent presence may indicate bladder cancer.

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Frequently Asked Questions

The most commonly asked questions by our users.

What is the Ribbon Checkup Kit?

The Ribbon Checkup Kit is a home health monitoring tool that uses urine test strips placed on color cards. You simply urinate on the strip, place it on the card, and then use the Ribbon App to analyze the strip and display the results. Go to test.ribboncheckup.com

How do I use the Ribbon Checkup Kit?
  • Go to test.ribboncheckup.com
  • Urinate on the test strip.
  • Place the strip on the color card.
  • Take a picture of the card with the Ribbon App on your cell phone.
  • The app will analyze the strip and card, then display your results.
How often should I use the Ribbon Checkup Kit?

The frequency of use depends on your personal health needs and your doctor's recommendations. Many users find it helpful to test regularly to keep track of their health.

Can I use the Ribbon Web App on any smartphone?

The Ribbon App is compatible with all smartphones. Go to test.ribboncheckup.com

What should I do if I have trouble using the kit or the app?

If you encounter any issues with the kit or the app, please contact our customer support team at support@ribboncheckup.com or use the chat window for assistance. We are here to help you.

How accurate are the test results from the Ribbon Checkup Kit?

The Ribbon Checkup Kit is designed to provide accurate and reliable results. However, for any medical concerns or abnormal results, please consult your healthcare provider.

How long does it take to see the results after taking the picture?

The Ribbon App typically analyzes the test strip and displays the results within a few seconds after you take the picture.

How can I reorder the Ribbon Checkup Kit?

You can reorder the Ribbon Checkup Kit through our website or directly within the Ribbon App. We also offer the convenience of regular, consistent shipping intervals to avoid the hassle of frequent reordering.

Can multiple family members use the same Ribbon Checkup Kit?

Each test strip is intended for single use by one individual. If multiple family members need to use the kit, ensure that each person uses a separate test strip.

Are there any special storage instructions for the test strips?

Yes, to ensure the accuracy of the test strips, store them in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight and moisture. Always seal the container tightly after use.

Why do you offer subscriptions?

Many people prefer to monitor their health year-round and avoid the hassle of frequent reordering. That's why we offer discounts and the convenience of regular, consistent shipping intervals.

What kit do you recommend?

We recommend the using the kit that best fits your lifestyle and current health issues.

Is the Ribbon App easy to use for older adults?

Yes, the Ribbon App is designed with user-friendliness in mind, making it accessible and easy to navigate for older adults. Our support team is also available to assist with any questions or difficulties. Go to test.ribboncheckup.com

Is this kit covered by insurance?

The Ribbon Kit is currently not covered by insurance providers. We have made every effort to keep the kit as affordable as possible.

Analyzing for Problems in Your Body

Some of the major issues Ribbon checks for

Kidney Issues

Ribbon strips can provide valuable information about kidney health by assessing various aspects of urine composition. Here's how each parameter relates to kidney health:

Specific gravity: Specific gravity measures the concentration of solutes in urine, reflecting the kidneys' ability to concentrate or dilute urine properly. Abnormal specific gravity levels may indicate kidney dysfunction or dehydration.

pH: Urine pH measures the acidity or alkalinity of urine. Normal urine pH ranges from acidic to slightly alkaline. Abnormal pH levels could indicate certain kidney conditions, metabolic disorders, or urinary tract infections.

Protein: Proteinuria, the presence of protein in urine, can be a sign of kidney damage or disease. Normally, the kidneys filter out waste products while retaining essential proteins in the bloodstream. Proteinuria can indicate impaired kidney function, such as glomerular damage.

Glucose: Glucosuria, the presence of glucose in urine, can indicate diabetes or impaired kidney function. Normally, the kidneys reabsorb glucose from the urine, but when blood glucose levels are high, as in diabetes, excess glucose spills into the urine.

Ketones: Ketones in urine can indicate diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a complication of diabetes characterized by high levels of ketones in the blood. In DKA, the body breaks down fat for energy when glucose is not available, leading to ketone production.

Blood: The presence of blood in urine (hematuria) can indicate kidney stones, urinary tract infections, kidney disease, or other conditions affecting the kidneys or urinary tract. It's essential to determine whether the blood is from the kidneys (hematuria) or from the lower urinary tract (hemoglobinuria).

Nitrites: Nitrites in urine may indicate the presence of bacteria in the urinary tract, suggesting a urinary tract infection (UTI). UTIs can sometimes lead to kidney infections if left untreated, so prompt diagnosis and treatment are crucial.

Leukocytes: The presence of leukocytes (white blood cells) in urine can indicate inflammation or infection in the urinary tract, including the kidneys. Elevated levels may suggest a UTI or kidney infection.

Urobilinogen and bilirubin: Abnormal levels of urobilinogen and bilirubin in urine may indicate liver or biliary tract disorders, which can indirectly affect kidney function. In some cases, kidney disease can also cause abnormalities in these parameters.

Liver Issues

Some parameters in a Ribbon strip indirectly provide insights into liver health or detect conditions that may affect the liver. Here's how some of the parameters relate to liver health:

Urobilinogen and Bilirubin: These substances are produced during the breakdown of hemoglobin in the liver. Elevated levels of urobilinogen or bilirubin in urine may indicate liver diseases such as hepatitis or liver cirrhosis.

Specific Gravity: While specific gravity primarily reflects kidney function, it can indirectly indicate dehydration or fluid imbalances, which may affect liver health. Severe dehydration can stress the liver and impair its function.

Protein: Proteinuria (presence of protein in urine) can result from kidney damage or dysfunction, but it can also occur due to liver diseases such as cirrhosis. Liver cirrhosis can lead to a decrease in protein synthesis, causing proteins to leak into the urine.

Glucose: Elevated glucose levels in urine (glucosuria) are typically associated with diabetes. While diabetes primarily affects insulin production or sensitivity, poorly managed diabetes can lead to complications affecting the liver, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

Ketones: Ketones in urine may indicate diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a serious complication of diabetes. While DKA primarily results from insulin deficiency rather than liver dysfunction, severe DKA can affect liver function and lead to liver complications.

Blood: The presence of blood in urine (hematuria) may indicate kidney or urinary tract issues, but it can also occur in conditions affecting the liver, such as hepatitis or liver cirrhosis. In these cases, blood in the urine may result from bleeding disorders associated with liver dysfunction.

Nitrites and Leukocytes: Elevated levels of nitrites and leukocytes in urine suggest urinary tract infections (UTIs), which may occur secondary to conditions affecting the liver, such as biliary tract obstruction or liver abscess.

Diabetes

A ten-parameter urine test, also known as urinalysis, can provide valuable information about diabetes by detecting certain substances or abnormalities in the urine. Here's how some of the parameters in a urinalysis relate to diabetes:

Glucose: Normally, the kidneys filter glucose from the blood and reabsorb it back into the bloodstream. However, when blood glucose levels are consistently high, as in diabetes, the kidneys may not be able to reabsorb all the glucose, leading to its presence in the urine (glucosuria). Detecting glucose in urine can indicate uncontrolled diabetes or poorly managed blood sugar levels.

Ketones: Ketones are produced when the body breaks down fat for energy in the absence of sufficient insulin, as seen in uncontrolled diabetes or during periods of fasting or starvation. Ketones in urine (ketonuria) can be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a serious complication of diabetes characterized by dangerously high levels of ketones in the blood. DKA requires immediate medical attention.

Specific gravity: Specific gravity measures the concentration of solutes in urine, reflecting the kidneys' ability to concentrate or dilute urine properly. High specific gravity may indicate dehydration, which can occur with poorly controlled diabetes due to excessive urination (polyuria) and fluid loss.

Protein: Proteinuria (presence of protein in urine) can be a sign of kidney damage, which is a common complication of diabetes known as diabetic nephropathy. Elevated protein levels in urine may indicate early kidney damage in diabetic individuals.

Persistently high levels of glucose and protein in urine can be indicative of diabetic kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy), a common complication of diabetes that affects the kidneys' ability to filter waste products from the blood.

Preeclampsia / UTI

The Ribbon test can provide some indications that may suggest potential pregnancy complications. Here's how some of the parameters in a urinalysis can relate to pregnancy issues:

Protein: Elevated levels of protein in urine (proteinuria) can be a sign of preeclampsia, a serious pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and protein in the urine. Preeclampsia requires prompt medical attention as it can lead to complications for both the mother and the baby.

Glucose: While glucose in urine (glucosuria) can be associated with diabetes, it can also occur in pregnancy due to gestational diabetes, a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can increase the risk of pregnancy complications if not properly managed.

Ketones: Ketones in urine (ketonuria) may indicate inadequate food intake or metabolism, which can occur in conditions such as hyperemesis gravidarum (severe nausea and vomiting during pregnancy) or gestational diabetes. If left untreated, these conditions can lead to complications for the mother and the baby.

Blood: The presence of blood in urine (hematuria) may indicate urinary tract infections (UTIs) or other conditions that can occur during pregnancy. UTIs can lead to complications if left untreated, so it's important to detect and treat them promptly during pregnancy.

Leukocytes: Elevated levels of leukocytes (white blood cells) in urine may indicate urinary tract infections, which are common during pregnancy due to hormonal changes and increased pressure on the bladder. UTIs should be promptly treated during pregnancy to prevent complications.

Nitrites: Nitrites in urine may indicate the presence of bacteria in the urinary tract, suggesting a urinary tract infection. UTIs are more common during pregnancy and can lead to complications if left untreated.